The Civil War Search – did your Ancestors Serve?

“AFRO readers who have in their possession documentary proof or pictures of Civil War veterans are invited to write to: Civil War, AFRO magazine Section.”

Baltimore Afro-American, January 19, 1960

In 1960 editors of the Baltimore Afro-American prepared their readers for the U. S. Civil War centennial commemorations. They asked “survivors” of Civil War veterans, including 8718 soldiers and 640 sailors who had served for Maryland, to share information. The newspaper also printed the rosters of the 4th, 7th, 19th, and 30th United States Colored Infantry (USCI) to help families remember or to determine if they had a relative who had donned the “blue uniform of his country.”

Descendants responded quickly, and throughout the year, the Afro-American printed selected stories, along with drawings and sometimes even photographs. Several times this included more extended histories, such as “GRANDPA: Story of a Man who Served in Quartermasters, Navy, Calvary, and Infantry during the Civil War.”

An entire page highlighted Pauli Murray’s grandfather, Robert Fitzgerald, who served in the 5th Massachusetts Colored Cavalry. The article ended with an “EDITOR’S NOTE…Can Any Afro reader’s family match Grandpa Fitzgerald who served in all the Civil War services?”

The Anglo-American took great pride in another extended history, which they covered in various issues over the years. John H. Murphy, Sr., who founded the newspaper in 1892, had served in the 30th USCI. Carl J. Murphy, John’s son, expanded the readership beyond Baltimore. Under his forty-five years of editorial leadership the newspaper gained a national audience, with published issues in thirteen U. S. cities. Carl served editor during the Civil War centennial. The paper is still owned by the Murphy family today (see Afro News).

In 1942, the 50th Anniversary Edition of the newspaper included passages from a letter John H. Murphy wrote on Christmas day, 1920. In it he recalled his Civil War service “fighting with General Grant in the wilderness” and how he was with “General William T. Sherman when he captured the rebel army of General Joe Johnston.” Murphy reflected that him it was “a real war for liberty. A man with the blue uniform of my country as a guarantee of freedom, and a sergeant’s stripe on my arm to prove.”

He also shared how he first met his wife, Martha Howard. After he mustered out of service, he returned home without informing his mother, as he hoped to surprise her. He was the one surprised though, when instead he first saw a young woman who was helping with the wash. Murphy went to his mother’s room, and after she welcomed him home he returned to the kitchen and once again encountered Martha.

Murphy recounted, “I remember how she picked up my cap and coat where I had dropped them; put the cap on her head and pressed the stripes on the coat sleeve with thoughtful fingers. This was the army blue, and this was the soldier who fought with Abe Lincoln and (Ulysses S.) Grant and Sherman to free the slaves.”

Other stories referred to his enslavement before the war, and how “Corporal Murphy won his stripes on the battlefield for courageous actions and was cited by Gen. W. T. Sherman.” Another promotion came when “for another daring deed, he was elevated to Sergeant by the General.” According to his military service records, John H. Murphy enlisted in Baltimore in March 1864. He told mustering officers that he was born in the city, was eighteen years old, and worked as a waiter.

Murphy served as a sergeant in Company G, but spent almost seven months in the hospital due to illness, first at City Point then at the L’Ouverture U.S.A. General Hospital in Alexandria. As they prepared to settle pay and bounties due, officers of the 30th USCI reported that Murphy had been a free man on April 19, 1861.

Most of the stories about the Black Civil War soldiers and sailors included in the 1960 issues of the Afro-American contain less details. But their service undoubtedly provided the same dignity and honor to the descendants who proudly shared information about their ancestor’s with the newspaper and its readers.

Yet by the eve of the 100th anniversary of the American Civil War readers had grown weary of the centennial commemoration planning. Some questioned why they would want to remember the conflict, when the nation still denied African Americans their civil rights a full century after Black soldiers and sailors had risked their lives to preserve the United States. Others grew more dismayed at the focus on “honorable” Confederates.

A January 1961 article entitled, “Civil War celebration; is it a national farce?,” was not the first time that readers encountered claims similar to the assertion that the “south may have lost the Civil War, but it is sure going to win the centennial.”

Although John H. Murphy III, grandson of the newspaper’s founder, served on the Civil War Centennial Committee of Baltimore, the paper no longer provided the space for stories about the African American men who served in the United States Colored Troops and the U.S. navy. Only a few years later a reader expressed his frustration about the treatment of Black soldiers from the Revolutionary War to Vietnam. He asked, “Does anyone know the whereabouts of any descendants of the gallant soldiers”?

Let us today continue to learn about these men, and more importantly share their stories so that their significant contributions toward ending slavery and preservation of the United States cannot be erased.

I have organized the submissions alphabetically by the soldier’s or sailor’s last name. Two of the family members did not provide their ancestor’s name – I have placed them at the end.

Editorial methods for the newspaper transcriptions


SUBMITTED ACCOUNTS

OVER 100
Newport News, Va. – I am a daughter of a Civil War veteran, George Ashby of Allentown, N.J. His pension check came there for years. He was 100 when he died. I was born in 1871.
LETITIA ASHBY NICHOLSON
3210 Chestnut Ave.


Selbyville, Del.- I am the nephew of David Ayers, my mother’s brother, and Millbey Showell, my father’s brother, both having served in the Seventh Regiment, USCT.

I am now 86 years old and an active citizen of Selbyville.
PHILLIP C. SHOWELL


SERVED AT PETERSBURG
Richmond, Va. – My father was in the Civil War. His name, Joseph Banister. He served at Petersburg and Yorktown.
MRS. LEONA BANNISTER JASPER
2015 Monteiro Ave.


FOURTH REGIMENT
Baltimore, Md. – My grandfather, Benjamin F. Banks was a member of Co. G, 4th Regiment, USCT. He served from Aug. 11, 1863 to May 4, 1866.
MRS. FLORENCE BANKS ROANE
2527 Reisterstown Rd.


HONORABLE DISCHARGE
Cambridge, Md. – My grandfather, James Bantum, was a veteran of the Civil War. I have a picture of the gospel-shaped monument containing a copy of his honorable discharge.

He was enrolled Sept. 9, 1863 and discharged Jan. 5, 1866.
MRS. GLADYS ENNELS
77 Washington St.


ATTENDED HORSES
Chicago, Ill. -My grandfather was a Civil War Veteran who moved to Bloomington, Ill. After his honorable discharge from the army.

His name was Phillip Beldon, born in Fayette, Mo. He was inducted there too. During his active years, he attended horses in a stable.
MRS.GLADYS O. McCray
5741 S. LaSalle ST.


COMPANY A PRIVATE
Milford, Del. – My father, Joseph T. Berry, was a private in Co.A, 39th Regiment, USCT. He was enrolled on March 22, 1864 and discharged on December 4, 1865.
EVA L. HICKS
504 West St.


TILL WARS END
Dorchester, Mass. – My grandfather served in the Civil War from 1863 until 1865. He was a volunteer in the 6th Regiment from Pennsylvania.

He took part in battles at Bull Run, Manassas Gap and the Wilderness, and also Gettysburg. My brother has his discharge papers.

His name was David L. Blaine.
LUKE WILEY
45 Stanwood St.


Newark, N.J. – My grandfather was a Civil War Veteran from prince Edward County, Va. His name, Henry Booker.
MRS. MARJORIE HOLMES
33 Lincoln St.


PRIVATE
Hopewell, Va. – I am the granddaughter of George Bridges who was a private in Company E, 40th Regiment USCT. He was discharged April 25, 1866 at Chattanooga, Tenn.
LUCINDA W. EPPS
Box 181


IN COMPANY C
Dover, Del. – Under Company C of the 30th Regiment USCT, Maryland Volunteers were the names of Albert Brown, my uncle, and Benjamin Collister, my mother’s grandfather.

I only know about them from hearing my parents talk. They were deceased before I was born.
MILDRED HAWKINS


Hamlet, N.C.- I am the son of Isaac Brown who was a wagoner in the 31st Ohio Regt.

He was born in Virginia.
EDWARD B. BROWN
Rt. 1 Box 471.


Richmond, Va. – My father, John Thomas Brown, was a Civil War veteran of Company C. His home was in Baltimore, although he died in New York City in 1945.
MRS. VIOLA OLDS
620 N. 7th St.


Baltimore, Md.- The writer is 82 years old and my father Nelson Brown was a private in the Civil War. He was enlisted as far as I know in Virginia.
JEREMIAH BROWN
815 W. Saratoga St.


S. C. DISCHARGE
Philadelphia, Pa.- My grandfather, William L. Brown, Pvt. Co F. 26th Regiment, enlisted January 8, 1864 and was discharged August 28, 1865 at Hilton Head, S.C.
ROSWELL C. BROWN


Providence, R.I. – I have documentary proof that my father from Hartford, Conn., Private Alexander Butler, Co. E, 38th Regt. U.S. Cold Infantry and uncle, from Sog Harbor, Long Island, Simon Hasbrook (Cool Heaven), United States Navy served in the Civil War. I am originally from Hartford, Conn.
Mrs. ETTA ROSE


Scotland, Md. – Our father, Charles Butler, volunteered in the Civil War, and was appointed 1st sergeant in Company B of the 38th Regiment, USCT.

He served from February 10, 1864 to October 25, 1865. He was discharged at Whites Ranch, Texas. Commanding officer of his regiment was Major Lucius H. Wanen.
JOHN T. BUTLER
MRS. HENRIETTA COOK
Mrs. Catherine Purnell


Philadelphia, Pa. – I am the son of Civil War corporal Henry Chase, who enlisted with Company E, 41st Regt., USCT Inf. on Sept. 28, 1864. He was wounded in the right hand and honorably discharged Set. 30, 1865.

He died in 1928 and is buried at National Cemetery in Philadelphia.
WILLIAM HENRY CHASE
5432 Spring St.


IN COMPANY C
Dover, Del. – Under Company C of the 30th Regiment USCT, Maryland Volunteers were the names of Albert Brown, my uncle, and Benjamin Collister, my mother’s
grandfather.

I only know about them from hearing my parents talk. They were deceased before I was born.
MILDRED HAWKINS


COMPANY A MEMBER
Baltimore, Md. – My grandfather, Levin Conquest, was in the Civil War. He was in Co. A, 4th Regiment USCT. He served from July 13, 1863 to May 4, 1866, and was discharged at Washington, D.C.
SAMUEL MURRAY
606 W. Lafayette St.


TWO SURVIVORS
Florence, Ala.- I am the daughter of a Civil War veteran. He was Corporal Lawson Coffee, Co A, U.S.C.T.

He enlisted at Huntsville, Ala., April 1, 1863. I have his discharge to substantiate this claim. My sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Coffee Lewis of Washington, D.C. has a picture of him in his uniform.

It was enlarged from a small tintype picture. All of his records are in the National Archives in Washington except his discharge and the orders making him a corporal. I have these.
MRS. FRANCES C. NAILS
2227 Chisholm Rd.


DISCHARGED AS SERGEANT
Baltimore, Md. – My father was enrolled March 21, 1864 at Baltimore, Md. Mustered in service, 24 March, 1864 as a private in Company B, 39th Regiment, U.S. Colored Infantry.

He was honorably discharged as Sergeant, 19 December, 1864 at Alexandria, Va. He was wounded in action, July 30, 1864 at Petersburg. He lost his leg.
MRS. LILLIE M. FOREMAN
1417 W. Franklin St.


[Joseph Cornish, image from his military service records]


Easton, Md. – Our uncle, Thomas Cornish, enlisted from Talbot County, Sept. 1, 1863. He was a private in Capt. Wilmer’s Company K, 4th Regiment, U.S. Colored Infantry.

He was wounded at Dutch Gap, Va., and died in the U.S. General Hospital, Fort Monroe, Va., Oct 17, 1864. Two nephews and myself are survivors. His niece,
VIRGIE FIELDS BENTLEY


Philadelphia, Pa. – I am one of the survivors of George Fields, who was listed during the first week of the Civil War search.

He was drafted from St. Georges, Del., and died on a three-day march out of Richmond.
MRS. LETHA BUTLER


Philadelphia, Pa. – I saw the name of my grandfather Edmund Floyd listed under the Civil War veterans. My father, Alfred Floyd, was his eldest son. I am originally from Easton, Md.
MRS. MARY E. WELDON


Baldwin, N.C. – I saw my grandfather’s name in your Civil War List, Thomas Fowler.

He was in the Civil War when he was young. Some of the things he collected from the war have been misplaced. He lived to be well over 100 years old. He went blind just before his death.

I am one of his descendants, a grandchild.
Mrs. LILA LEWIS


Tyaskin, Md. – I am the daughter of Civil War veteran John H. Garrison, a private of Captain Thomas Reed’s Company B, 19th Regiment, USC, MD. Volunteers, who enrolled on the eight day of May, 1864.

He was discharged January 15, 1867 at Brownsville, Tex. A copy of his discharge was presented to my mother Susan Garrison.
CLARA GARRISON CONWAY
Rt. 1 Box 48


FOURTH REGIMENT
Baltimore, Md. – I saw my grandfather’s name, Jacob Gibson listed in the roster of the 4th regiment of Md. USCT.

After the Civil War, he made his home on Solleys Rd., Glen Burnie, Md. until his death.
MRS. BESSIE JOSEPH


RECRUITING
Cheltenham, Md. – Lorenzo F. Gould, who served in the Civil War, was my grandfather. An interesting account of the recruiting of troops is found in the book called “Gouldtown,” by William and Theophilus G. Steward.

Here are a few excerpts from it:
“By means of a copy of Upton’s Tactics, a company was formed in Gouldtown and drilled. (Editor’s note- Gouldtown is in Southern New Jersey, 30 miles from Delaware Memorial Bridge).

“They made the offer to the Government to raise a regiment of colored men for the service. They remembered the heroic conduct of the colored soldiers at the battle of Red Bank during the Revolution, and decided to emulate the example of those men.

“The offer was not accepted, and the people felt such rebuff that they decided to wait until they were really wanted before attempting to go to war.

“When colored soldiers were wanted by the government, meetings were held at the old schoolhouse and orators came from Fairfield township offering large bounties for volunteer substitutes.

The young me of the town did not feel so much like going to war as they had felt before the rebuff, and they informed the orators that they were not going to stop bullets as substitutes, but would go on their own footing, which they did when drafted.

(Editor’s Note – During the Civil War, if a man was drafted, he did not have to serve in the army if he was able to pay to have someone substitute for him.)

“Of those who served in the Rebellion were Hosa Peirce, William H. Gould, Wanca Pierce, Robert Goldsboro, Mark Pierce, Jedediah Pierce, Lewis Murray, William Murray, Hiram Murray, Lorenzo F. Gould, Charles Lloyd, Charles Pierce, Ephraim Pierce and Henry Murray.”

Philadelphia, Pa. – We wish to submit the name of Robert Isaiah Gould of Millington, Kent Co., Md., who died in Philadelphia in 1897.

He was interred in the National Cemetery here and inscribed on his marker is I. R.
Gould, Co. F, 9th Regt. USCT.
FRAZIER W. GOULD
WILLIS C. COULD
JAMES L. GOULD
2048 Master St.


Baltimore, Md. – My father, Issac S. Gross, was a private in Company H, 50th Regiment. He was enrolled on August 21, 1861 at the age of 23.

His residence at the time was Reading, Pa., but he was a native of Calvert County, Md. He was mustered into the service at Harrisburg, Pa., September 10, 1861, honorable discharged, and received a pension until his death. My mother continued to receive the pension until her death in 1910.
MRS. MARY G. BENNETT
1520 Druid Hill Ave.


LANDSMAN
Washington, D.C. – My father, George Hall, enlisted in the U.S. Naval Service, July 7, 1864 and was discharged from service July 7, 1865 as Landsman from the U.S.S. Wyandam. His certificate of discharge, No. 250730.
RICHARD M. HALL


SOUTH CAROLINIAN
New York, N.Y. – My father, Friday Hamilton was a Civil War Veteran who served with Company G, 34th Regiment, South Carolina.

His file number in the War Department was 488 and his pension certificate number was 593885.
ULYSESES F. HAMILTON


F COMPANY
Baltimore, Md.- I am a grandson of Joseph Hardy, Co F, 30th Regiment, USCT. My father is Isaac D. Hardy, who is now 78.
ELMER N. HARDY


Baltimore, Md. – I am the nephew of Jacob Harris, who served in Company G., 30th Regt., USCT.
WILLIAM H. HARRIS
2010 Druid Hill Ave


WOUNDED VET
Baltimore, Md. – My grandfather, John P. Harris, was a sergeant in Company G, 39 USCT Regt. He was wounded. His thumb was shot off and he died of blood poisoning.
MRS. CARRIE BLACKWELL
1624 Hartford Ave.


Mattapan, Mass. – I am proud to write this letter for my mother Mrs. Amy Ransom, nee Harris.

My late grandfather Lewis W. Harris served with Company C 5th Cavalry and was discharged with honors in Boston, Mass.

His discharge is well framed, hanging on my mother’s dining room wall. It is signed by the Adj. General J. A. Cunningham and the Governor of the Commonwealth of Mass., William Claflin, April 1870.
LOUIS B. RANSOM SR


MANY MEMORIES
Baltimore, Md. – I noticed in the AFRO Magazine Section dated May 31, 1960 a number of soldier’s names who were in the Civil War. I am almost sure that my father’s name, Thomas J. Harris and my uncle’s name, William B. Harris are on the list.

I also noticed the name of George Mahoney who was a sergeant and friend of my father and uncle. My grandfather Thomas J. Harris was also a soldier in the Civil War.

The appearance of father’s name in your newspaper brought back many memories of the experiences my father often told me of while he served in the army.
REV. PAUL J. HARRIS


Providence, R.I. – I have documentary proof that my father from Hartford, Conn., Private Alexander Butler, Co. E, 38th Regt. U.S. Cold Infantry and uncle, from Sog Harbor, Long Island, Simon Hasbrook (Cool Heaven), United States Navy served in the Civil War. I am originally from Hartford, Conn.
Mrs. ETTA ROSE


Greenville, N.C. – I am the sole survivor of the Civil War veteran William H. Henraham. He volunteered and went into service along with Gen. Grimes, of Grimesland, N.C., Pitt County.

His discharge papers were destroyed by fire. I remember the name of only one of the officers, Sgt. Mullen who tried to get in touch with members of his outfit years ago.

I am now 90 years old.
Mrs. Elizabeth H. Kearney
614 Clark St.


FIRST SERGEANT
Marcus Hook, Pa. -My grandfather, Peter Henson was a first sergeant in Company E, 3rd regiment, USCT. He enrolled on July 6, 1863 and was discharged October 31, 1865 at Jacksonville, Fla.
LEROY J. PERNSLEY


Philadelphia, Pa. – I am now 90 years old and a survivor of a Civil War veteran. We came to Chester, Pa. From Maryland around 1881. My father, Levin Henry, was a member of Company D, 9th Regiment, USCT.

He received a disability pension until his death in 1914. In 1900, the pension to veterans was $6.00 per month.
KATIE HENRY JONES
810 N. 42nd St.


NOBLE CAUSE
Quantico, Md. – My grandfather was Columbus Horsey who served in Company I. He used to be so proud of the fact that he was a veteran for such a noble cause. He lived to be 84.
GEORGE L. STEWART.


Cincinnati, Ohio – My father, Leander Howard, served with Co. G, 54th Infantry Regiment, organized in Boston, Mass., and the first regiment of colored soldiers organized.

Their leader was Col. Shaw (Robb) killed in battle of Ft. Wagner. My father was also wounded twice in the same battle, recovered and served to the end of the war.

Along with one John Wall, he traveled, mostly by foot, from Cincinnati to Boston to enlist at Boston.

I have on the wall of my home a testimonial signed on April, 1870 by Wm. Chaflin, Governor, and Jas. A. Cunningham, Atty. Gen. Of the Commonwealth f Massachusetts, honoring my father for this service.
CHARLES A. HOWARD
6000 Chandler St.


DIED ON THE FIELD
Bridgeton, N.J. -I am the granddaughter of Andrew Jackson of Salem Co. who died on the field during the Civil War. I have a picture of him in his uniform, also his flag and watch.
HANNAH M. HENSON
Cobbs Mill Rd.


Washington, D.C. – My father, Noah, alias Henry Jackson who fought in the Civil War, was a private in Co. H, 14th Regt., USCT. He was wounded in the right thigh.

He changed his name because he thought that Noah sounded like a girl’s name.
MRS. ADA JACKSON MONROE
2902 Stanton Rd., SE


NAVY AND ARMY
Baltimore, Md.- My father, Thomas Jackson of the 4th Regiment, USCT enlisted in Maryland. He later was transferred to the Navy as ordinary seaman. He was born July 4, 1840 and lived to be 92.
REV. T. J. JACKSON, JR.


Parkesburg, Pa. – My father, Richard T. Queen served in the U.S. Army in the 24th U.S. Infantry, 1870-1875; 1882-1889, and is buried in Arlington national Cemetery.

My grandfather, Charles Alexander Johnson, served in the U.S. Navy almost continuously between June, 1851, and October 1901.

My uncle, Lewis Queen, transferred from the army to the Navy in 1864.

Another uncle, James Queen, was a color sergeant and was killed at the Battle of the Crater. He is buried in Druid Hill Cemetery at Baltimore.
Co. H. D. QUEEN
225 N. Limestone Rd.


FORMER CORPORAL
Baltimore, Md. – My grandfather served in the Civil War. I have a document of a pension certificate of my grandmother’s

His name was Henry Johnson, born in King and Queens County, Va. He enlisted at Sparrows Point, Md.

He was a corporal, Company B., 23rd Regiment, United States Colored Infantry.
MRS. GLORIA ANDERSON
1420 May Court


FOURTH REGIMENT
Baltimore, Md. – It so happens that my godmother’s father (she is also my second cousin) was a Civil War Veteran. His name was listed in the list published. His name, William H. Johnson, Co B., Fourth Regiment U.S. Colored Troops.
MRS. MYRTLE HARPER
2832 Booker T. Drive


Philadelphia, Pa. – My father, Jesse Henry Johnsson served in Company A of the 30th Md. Regiment. I have letters from the War Department to certify this.

He was born free near Havre de Grace, Md. In 1835. His brother Frank was killed in battle.
JESSE H. JOHNSON JR.
3603 Richmond St.


Washington, D.C. – My husband’s father, John Jones of St. Mary’s County, Md., was enrolled on February 5, 1864 and discharged at Brownsville, Tex. On March 17, 1866.

He was a member of Company B, 2nd Regiment of Captain Chatis’s Battery USCT.
MRS M. BERTHA JONES


IN TWO COMPANIES
Washington, D.C. – I saw my dad’s name listed in the roster of Company C and D of the 4th Regiment. His name is Edward Langford.

I am his oldest daughter and have his enlistment papers saying he was in both of those companies. He was in both the infantry and cavalry.

Some of these papers say he was born in Worcester Co., Md.
MRS. PEARL SAUNDERS
1437 Shepherd St., NW.


MANY MEMORIES
Baltimore, Md. – I noticed in the AFRO Magazine Section dated May 31, 1960 a number of soldier’s names who were in the Civil War. I am almost sure that my father’s name, Thomas J. Harris and my uncle’s name, William B. Harris are on the list.

I also noticed the name of George Mahoney who was a sergeant and friend of my father and uncle. My grandfather Thomas J. Harris was also a soldier in the Civil War.

The appearance of father’s name in your newspaper brought back many memories of the experiences my father often told me of while he served in the army.
REV. PAUL J. HARRIS


CAVALRYMAN
Boston, Mass. – Here is the name of my grandfather and his record, who fought in the Civil War. His name, Berry Mitchell, Pvt. CO. E, 3rd U.S. Colored Cavalry. Enlisted Nov. 15, 1864. Mustered in Vicksburg, Nov. 16, 1864. Served until January 26,1866.
JOHN W. MITCHELL
750 Tremont St.


Washington, D.C. – My grandfather was a Civil War Veteran from Charles County, Md. His name was Brookes Muschett (alias Brooks Marshall).

He was a private in Co. G. 5th Regt. Mass. Vol and is buried in Mt.Olivet Cemetery here in D.C.
Mrs. CECELIA A. GRAVES
46 58th St., SE


NAME LISTED
Portsmouth, Va. – My father, Jesse Nichols was one of the 9,000 Maryland Civil War Colored Volunteers.

His name is listed in one of those war books in the Congressional Library, Washington D.C.
LEE JACOB NICHOLS


CHANGED NAME
Baltimore, Md.- I am the daughter of Civil War Veteran Aaron Nicholson or Meekins. He ran away when he was very young, so he changed his last name.

However, he corrected it before he discharged.

He was born in Dorchester County, on the Eastern Shore of Maryland, went into service in July 1863. He was in the navy on the Battleship Massachusetts, later transferred to the army where he was wounded.

He died in Johns Hopkins Hospital May 26, 1929 and is buried in Soldier’s Cemetery.
MRS. FRANCES PULLEY


ONLY SURVIVOR
Princess Anne, MD.-My grandfather, Albert Nixon was in Company I, 30th Regiment, U.S.C.T. He was in the battles of Petersburg, Dutch Gap, Fort Fisher, Bermuda Hundred, and Chaplains Farm. I am the only survivor.
THE REV. CHARLES A. NIXON
408 Beechwood St.


A VOLUNTEER
Cincinnati, Ohio – My grandfather, James Pleasant, enrolled the 7th of May, 1864 in Captain Charles E. Allan’s Company F, 5th Regiment of Massachusetts Cavalry.

He was discharged October 31, 1865 at Clarksville, Texas. Commanding officer at the time was Lt. J. Mansur, Paymaster was Major J. A. Brodhead.
ALBERT E. PLEASANT, JR.
2314 Kenton St.


Parkesburg, Pa. – My father, Richard T. Queen served in the U.S. Army in the 24th U.S. Infantry, 1870-1875; 1882-1889, and is buried in Arlington national Cemetery.

My grandfather, Charles Alexander Johnson, served in the U.S. Navy almost continuously between June, 1851, and October 1901.

My uncle, Lewis Queen, transferred from the army to the Navy in 1864.

Another uncle, James Queen, was a color sergeant and was killed at the Battle of the Crater. He is buried in Druid Hill Cemetery at Baltimore.
Co. H. D. QUEEN
225 N. Limestone Rd.


Bassett, Va. – I am the great-grandson of William Collen Revels who served with an outfit from Indiana. He was a cousin of Hiram Rhodes Revels who was supposed to have helped organize the first colored regiment from Maryland.

Both of them were born in North Carolina.
CHARLES E. BURNEY


WOUNDED IN ACTION
Camden, N.J. – My father, John Parker Roberts enlisted at the age of 19. He was wounded in battle, his shoulder blade was blown away.

I remember his saying that he crawled for four miles on his knees to a hospital to get aid. His company commander, when told of what my father had done, came to him and said: “Man, you must believe in God, because you could not have done this alone.”

He was later one of the founders of the Wrightsville AME Church, Wrightsville, N.J. He was a member of Company C, 32 Regiment Colored Volunteers.
ESTHER LINDSEY SMITH
101 Brandvillage


Chester, Pa. – I am the sole survivor of Isaac Rothwell who served at Fort William Penn in Philadelphia Company K during the Civil War.
EDWARD BRISCOE


PENNSYLVANIA TROOPER
Philadelphia, Pa. – I am the grandson of one who served in the Civil War. Here is the date on his discharge papers.

Camp William Penn, Chelten Hills, Pa., January 30,1864.

This is to certify that Joseph E. Shanklin of Philadelphia, Pa., county of Penna. Was mustered into the service of the U.S. as Private in Co.K in the 22nd Regiment U.S. Colored Troops on the 12th day of January, 1864 to serve for three years – during the War.
S. PAUL SHANKLIN
1226 S.Markoe St.


Selbyville, Del.- I am the nephew of David Ayers, my mother’s brother, and Millbey Showell, my father’s brother, both having served in the Seventh Regiment, USCT.

I am now 86 years old and an active citizen of Selbyville.
PHILLIP C. SHOWELL


NAVAL VET
Washington, D.C. – My mother is one of two daughters whose father, Henry Clay Smith, served in the Civil War. He was buried in Arlington Cemetery in 1892. We have a picture of him in his navy hat.
MRS. ELMIRA H. PARKER
643 8th St., NE


NAVY VET
Providence, R.I. – My father, Isaac Smith served in the Navy during the Civil War. He died in 1914. I have proof of his service.
MRS. OSTENA F. LATHAM
54 Hamburg Ave.


FOURTH REGIMENT
Baltimore, Md. – My grandfather, John Stewart was from Somerset County, Md., and was a member of Co. F, 4th Regiment, USCT.
GEORGE STEWART


Baltimore, Md. – I am the daughter of a civil War veteran, James Taylor. He was a private in Company C, 26th Regiment. He enrolled Dec. 28, 1863 and was discharged Aug. 28, 1865 at Hilton Head, S.C.
ANNIE TAYLOR
2213 Brunt St.


Providence, R.I. – I had two uncles who were Civil War veterans. Ashleigh Teel, born in Pitt County, N.C. was enrolled and mustered into service Jan. 17, 1865 at New Bern, N.C. as a cook, Company E, 5th Regiment, Rhode Island Heavy Artillery.

The second uncle, Edmund Teel, who served in the same outfit as a cook. They were both discharged June 26, 1865 at New Bern, N.C.
MRS. CASSIE F. BANKS
92 Lester St.


Newport News, Va. – My stepfather was a veteran of the Civil War. His name was Solomon Thomas, a private in Company A, 7th Regiment, USCT.
MRS. LILA GARNES
553 25th St.


Baltimore, Md. – I am the daughter of a Civil War Veteran, John Thomas Tilghman, Pvt. Co. G., 39th Regt., USCT. He enlisted at Baltimore County, Md., March 31 1864, mustered into service at Baltimore and honorably discharged at Wilmington, N.C.,
Dec. 4, 1865.
MARGARET E. BOSTON
ANNIE M. HARRIS
2010 Druid Hill Ave.


Troutman, N.C. – My step-father, Marshall Torrence, was a Civil War veteran. He was in the war at Fort Fisher. I do not know who his general was or what Regiment he was in.
ESTHER MILLS


VIRGINIAN
Philadelphia, Pa. – My father, James Walker was a Civil War veteran. He was wounded in his left side which always affected him. He is originally from Petersburg, Va.
ESTELLE E. PRICE
726 S. 22nd St.


Baltimore, Md.- I am the daughter of Robert Wallace who was in Company K, USCT. He was born in St. Mary’s County, Md., and later moved to Westriver, Md.
MARY E. W. KEEN
Bruce Ct.


CHAPLAIN CAPTAIN
Washington, D.C. – I would like to tell you that my grandfather, Rev. William Waring, the first pastor of Berean Baptist Church, was a chaplain with a Michigan regiment and held the rank of Captain. He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.
MRS. DOROTHY W. HOWARD
1728 S St., NW


RHODE ISLANDER
Providence, R.I. – I am the granddaughter of Ira Waterman, Massachusetts Volunteers, a veteran of the Civil War.
MRS. GLADYS W. JAMES
65 Carrington Ave.


BALTIMORE, Md. – My grandfather, Nicholas Waters, of the Eastern Shore of Maryland, served in the army in Company A during the Civil War.

When I was a little boy, grandfather gave to my father, Levin Waters, a large discharge paper which he prized very much. This paper was given to me when I grew up.

It told about his height, weight, color of eyes and his rank. Unfortunately, some years afterwards, our home was destroyed by fire.
CLAUDE WATERS
Boys Village
Cheltenham, Md.


A CORPORAL
Darlington, Md. – My father, Philip Wegster was a corporal in Co. C, 4th Regiment, USCT. He enrolled July 15,1863 at Washington D.C. and was discharged April 27, 1866. He was born in Harford County, Md.
ALEXANDER WEBSTER


TOO YOUNG
New Bern, N.C.- My Father, James H. Wilkins tried to enlist at New Haven, Conn. He was 17, and rejected, so he went to Boston and enlisted in the 54th Mass. Regiment and served for three years.
MRS. MARY O. POOLE


GREAT GRANDFATHER
Washington, D.C. – I have a picture of my great-grandfather in his Civil War uniform. He was Henry Williams who died in Hampton, Va. At the Soldiers Home in 1922.

There are two immediate survivors, Mrs. Estelle W. Royster, Hampton, Va., and Robert Williams of the same city.
MRS. PATRICIA W. THOMAS
1200 Del. Ave., SW.


Macon, Ga. – My father, Richard Williams, was a Civil War Veteran. He was a member of Company H, 15th Regiment.
HARRIET WEDLOVE
1830 1st Ave.


Jesterville, Md. – Andrew Wilson, whose name was listed with the 7th Regiment, was my father.

He took part in the expedition under Gen. Foster. He was wounded and received an honorable discharge which I have.

He is buried in Cecilton, Cecil Co., Md. The inscription on the Tombstone says, Andrew Wilson, Pvt., Seventh Regiment, Company E.
MRS. ANNA B. DASHIELL


Elkton, Md. – I saw my father’s name under the Civil War veterans, Perry Wilson. He was born in Elkton, Md. And died September 13, 1917. I am his daughter.
Mrs. IRENE WILSON HARRIS


THREE YEAR’S SENTENCE
Baltimore, Md. – My grandfather, William H. Wilson was a member of Co. B 39th regiment, USCT. He enrolled December 21, 1864 and served three years.
GLADYS STANLEY
2200 N. Longwood


Nashville, Tenn. – I am writing concerning Augustus Wright of Company B whose name was listed in your Civil War search. I can show proof of kinship.


FROM OHIO
Washington, D.C. – Although he was enrolled in a Maryland unit, he enlisted in Ohio. His name was Beverly C. Yancey, Co. C, 4th Regiment, USCT. He enlisted Aug. 30, 1864. He has a granddaughter, Mrs. Beryl Y. Robinson of Newton, Mass.
Henry S. Robinson
1921 11th St., NW.

SUBMITTED ACCOUNTS THAT DO NOT INCLUDE THE SOLDIER’S NAME

Newark, N.J. – My grandfather’s name was listed in Company B of the 7th Regiment.
His name is on a plaque in Bellefonte, Pa. In front of the courthouse.
MARY GREEN
25 Stirling S.


Chicago, Ill. – My father was a Civil War veteran from 1861-1865. He served with the
Ohio Volunteers Company H. He was born in Richmond, Va., in 1849. He was on
pension when he passed in 1919.

Two sisters and myself are the only survivors.
JOHN W. NORRIS


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