Soldiers

U. S. Colored Troops sent to Salisbury Prison: Part 2

Black Civil War soldiers who died at Salisbury Prison

On March 21, 1865, the New York Tribune published the names of U.S. soldiers who died at the hands of Confederates at Salisbury Prison (North Carolina). The list covers only the period from December 1864-February 1865, and is incomplete. There are also some errors, especially related to the Black Civil War soldiers who perished while serving in the United States Colored Troops (USCT). For example, some of the regiment identifications are misleading. The men included in the article are marked with a ^ below.

Black Civil War soldiers who died at Salisbury Prison

The Roll of Honor, compiled in 1868 by order of the Quartermaster General’s Office, is another valuable source.… Read more

U. S. Colored Troops sent to Salisbury Prison: Part 1

Black Civil War soldiers who died at Salisbury Prison

On March 21, 1865, the New York Tribune published the names of U.S. soldiers who died at the hands of Confederates at Salisbury Prison (North Carolina). The list covers only the period from December 1864-February 1865, and is incomplete. And there are also some errors, especially related to the Black Civil War soldiers who perished while serving in the United States Colored Troops (USCT). For example, some of the regiment identifications are misleading. The men included in the article are marked with a ^ below.

Black Civil War soldiers who died at Salisbury Prison

The Roll of Honor, compiled in 1868 by order of the Quartermaster General’s Office, is another valuable source.… Read more

In the News: Anglo-African, May 6, 1865

FROM THE REGIMENTS.

CAMP OF THE 27TH U.S. COLORED REGIMENT.
FAISON’S STATION, W. & W. R.R., April 2, 1865.

MR. EDITOR: Perhaps the people would like to know where we are and what we are doing.

We, i.e. the Third Division of the Twenty-fifth Army Corps, are encamped at present at the above-named place guarding the railroad, and supplies now being sent along this line to the Western army now lying in our front. This division was detached from the main corps in the front of Richmond on the 3d of January and transported to North Carolina, where we with the Second Division of the Twenty-fourth Corps have been operating up to this date.… Read more

In the News: “Death of a Brave Colored Soldier”, Pvt. Charles W. Taylor, 6th USCI

The Anglo-African, August 6, 1864

DEATH OF A BRAVE COLORED SOLDIER.

MR. JOHN GRIMAGE, of Allegheny City, Pa., sends us the following letter, which was sent by Capt. Shedon, of the 6th Regiment U. S. Colored Troops, to Mrs. Joanna Taylor, of said city, describing the circumstances under which her son was killed in an action near Petersburg:

SPRING HILL, Va., June 19, 1864.

     MRS. JOANNA TAYLOR – My Dear Madam: Day before yesterday, Gen. Gilmore made a reconnaissance towards Petersburg, with a force of which our regiment was a part. We left camp the night before; went as far as our picket lines; laid down until the morning, and at daybreak started for Petersburg.… Read more

Benjamin Vann, 24th United States Colored Infantry: “please have it corected sose eye can get my pay”

Soon after private Benjamin Vann of the 24th USCI enlisted in Allegheny City in February 1864, the provost marshal of Harrisburg detailed the private to serve as a cook. Vann first worked at Pennsylvania’s Twenty-third Congressional District headquarters, then at Camp Reynolds near Pittsburgh. Almost eleven months later, Vann joined his regiment at Camp William Penn as a member of Company B. At some point that summer, he discovered that the time he labored before January 5, 1865, had not been counted towards his three-year military enlistment period.

In early April, 1865, Vann sought assistance from James W. Kirker, the provost marshal of the Twenty-third Congressional District.… Read more

USCT in Lawrence County, Ohio

Over Memorial Day weekend I will be speaking in Lawrence County, Ohio, about the 27th USCI in Ohio. The General William H. Lytle Camp #10 Department of Ohio Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War is holding a ceremony to recognize the installation of new government headstones at the W.D. Kelly cemetery in Ironton. The two soldiers, John Evans and Jefferson Finley, served in the 27th USCI, and some of their descendants will be in attendance.

Here is a list of Black men who lived in Lawrence County before, during, and/or after the war. I will continue to update this list.… Read more