New to my Black Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Bookshelf

Are you looking for something to read about the Black men who served in the Civil War ? Or maybe a book that includes the United States Colored Troops but is part of a much larger story? Here are the three newest titles that I have added to my Black Civil War Soldiers and Sailors bookshelf. One volume is not “new,” but I just recently learned of it. The other is a pre-order, and the last is about a fascinating man who helped to establish one of the first U.S. Colored regiments.

Newest additions to My Bookshelf

Dum Spiro, Spero: Chambersburg’s Black Civil War Soldiers and Sailors, 2nd ed.,… Read more

U. S. Colored Troops sent to Salisbury Prison: Part 2

Black Civil War soldiers who died at Salisbury Prison

On March 21, 1865, the New York Tribune published the names of U.S. soldiers who died at the hands of Confederates at Salisbury Prison (North Carolina). The list covers only the period from December 1864-February 1865, and is incomplete. There are also some errors, especially related to the Black Civil War soldiers who perished while serving in the United States Colored Troops (USCT). For example, some of the regiment identifications are misleading. The men included in the article are marked with a ^ below.

Black Civil War soldiers who died at Salisbury Prison

The Roll of Honor, compiled in 1868 by order of the Quartermaster General’s Office, is another valuable source.… Read more

U. S. Colored Troops sent to Salisbury Prison: Part 1

Black Civil War soldiers who died at Salisbury Prison

On March 21, 1865, the New York Tribune published the names of U.S. soldiers who died at the hands of Confederates at Salisbury Prison (North Carolina). The list covers only the period from December 1864-February 1865, and is incomplete. And there are also some errors, especially related to the Black Civil War soldiers who perished while serving in the United States Colored Troops (USCT). For example, some of the regiment identifications are misleading. The men included in the article are marked with a ^ below.

Black Civil War soldiers who died at Salisbury Prison

The Roll of Honor, compiled in 1868 by order of the Quartermaster General’s Office, is another valuable source.… Read more

The Civil War Search – did your Ancestors Serve?

“AFRO readers who have in their possession documentary proof or pictures of Civil War veterans are invited to write to: Civil War, AFRO magazine Section.”

Baltimore Afro-American, January 19, 1960

In 1960 editors of the Baltimore Afro-American prepared their readers for the U. S. Civil War centennial commemorations. They asked “survivors” of Civil War veterans, including 8718 soldiers and 640 sailors who had served for Maryland, to share information. The newspaper also printed the rosters of the 4th, 7th, 19th, and 30th United States Colored Infantry (USCI) to help families remember or to determine if they had a relative who had donned the “blue uniform of his country.”… Read more

In the News: Anglo-African, May 6, 1865

FROM THE REGIMENTS.

CAMP OF THE 27TH U.S. COLORED REGIMENT.
FAISON’S STATION, W. & W. R.R., April 2, 1865.

MR. EDITOR: Perhaps the people would like to know where we are and what we are doing.

We, i.e. the Third Division of the Twenty-fifth Army Corps, are encamped at present at the above-named place guarding the railroad, and supplies now being sent along this line to the Western army now lying in our front. This division was detached from the main corps in the front of Richmond on the 3d of January and transported to North Carolina, where we with the Second Division of the Twenty-fourth Corps have been operating up to this date.… Read more

In the News: “Death of a Brave Colored Soldier”, Pvt. Charles W. Taylor, 6th USCI

The Anglo-African, August 6, 1864

DEATH OF A BRAVE COLORED SOLDIER.

MR. JOHN GRIMAGE, of Allegheny City, Pa., sends us the following letter, which was sent by Capt. Shedon, of the 6th Regiment U. S. Colored Troops, to Mrs. Joanna Taylor, of said city, describing the circumstances under which her son was killed in an action near Petersburg:

SPRING HILL, Va., June 19, 1864.

     MRS. JOANNA TAYLOR – My Dear Madam: Day before yesterday, Gen. Gilmore made a reconnaissance towards Petersburg, with a force of which our regiment was a part. We left camp the night before; went as far as our picket lines; laid down until the morning, and at daybreak started for Petersburg.… Read more